BOSTON

NANTUCKET

EXHIBITS

EVENTS

MUSEUM STORE



 

The Museum of African American History is dedicated to preserving, conserving and accurately interpreting the contributions of African Americans in New England from the colonial period through the 19th century.

 

 

 

B   O  S  T  O  N      C  A  L  E  N  D  A  R

Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  617.725.0022 ext. 222

 

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UPCOMING PROGRAMS

 

 

 

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INFORMATION:

history@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSIONS:

General Admission: $5;

Youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

 

 

presents

HiFadility | Sounds of Freedom:
Jazz for Peace, Love and Prosperity

Thursday | September 18 | 6:00pm

46 Joy Street | Beacon Hill | Directions & discounted parking

  Admission fees apply* | Reservations encouraged

 

HiFadility is a young musician on the rise. Don't miss this award-winning Berklee College of Music-trained jazz pianist as he introduces a new music experience for MAAH Music and showcases his diverse talents as a composer, sound designer, producer, and turntablist. Known for connecting generations and genres, from jazz to hip-hop, and electronica to Caribbean folk, this improvisational wizard blends familiar keyboard stylings and creates a unique style that transcends traditional music boundaries. He harmonizes music of the past with sounds of the future; infuses traditional jazz with electronica, philosophical thought, and a unique performance style; and creates beats reflecting his Quisqueya ancestry as well as his American cultural influences.

 

The Boston-based artist is honored to introduce new audiences and followers to this concert in the African Meeting House, a National Historic Landmark renowned for centuries of facilitating avant-garde thinking about freedom and equality, and for creating space for social activism, cultural expression, and exchanging new ideas.

 

HiFadility, this year's winner of Boston’s Next Hot Music Producer Competition, is releasing his second EP recording this fall. His creative content has been featured on xxlmag.com, sportsillustrated.cnn.com, and vibe.com. He has performed hundreds of shows, including the Together Boston and the International Hip Hop Festivals, and has opened for Grammy Award-winning musician Common, as well as Flosstradamus, RJD2, Sammy Adams, K-Flay, Treasure Fingers, and The Cool Kids. His work is influenced by such artists as quintessential hip-hop producers Pete Rock, DJ Premier, and 9th Wonder, as well as the jazz greats, Miles Davis, Theolonius Monk, and Duke Ellington. <more>

 

Josephine Baker

 

 

 

Florence Ladd

 

 

 

PLEASE RSVP:

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSIONS:

General Admission: $5;

Youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

Award-winnning Author

Florence Ladd on The Spirit of Josephine
Thursday | September 25 | 6:00pm

46 Joy Street | Beacon Hill | Directions & discounted parking

  Admission fees apply* | Reservations encouraged

 


Inspired by legendary performer Josephine Baker, Florence Ladd's new novel is A Family Reunion in Paris: The Spirit of Josephine. The author skillfully breathes life into the featured character, Violet Fields, an aging African American singer in Paris clubs and music halls who is visited occasionally by the spirit of Josephine. Violet’s niece, Hope, visits from the US. and facilitates a renewal of family ties. This gripping story, set in Paris, delves into racial treatment, expat experience, social mobility of African Americans, and family reunion dynamics. It has been called a “deliciously evocative novel... sure to resonate with anyone who cherishes family and treasures Paris.”

 

Florence Ladd is a psychologist, fiction writer, and essayist whose novel, Sarah's Psalm, received the 1997 best fiction award from the American Library Association's Black Caucus. The Spirit of Josephine, was published in 2014; another novel, Jason Henderson’s Senior Year, will appear in 2015. Her poems have been published in The Women’s Review of Books, The Progressive, The Rockhurst Review, Sweet Auburn, Beyond Slavery and Transition. With Marion Kilson, she also is the co-author of Is That Your Child? Mothers Talk about Rearing Biracial Children.

 

Educated at Howard University (B.S.) and the University of Rochester (Ph.D. in psychology), she has taught at Simmons College, Robert College and the American College for Girls in Istanbul, the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Harvard Graduate School of Design. She has held deanships at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Wellesley College. In 1985-89, she worked for Oxfam America, as director of education programs and associate executive director. From 1989-1997, she was director of the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, at Harvard University.

Married to sculptor Wm. J. Halstead Harris, Ladd has five stepchildren and a son, the poet/librettist Michael Ladd, who lives in Paris. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Flavigny-sur-Ozerain.

 

 

 

Callie Crossley, WGBH

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RSVP VIA  EMAIL OR PHONE:

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

The Revolution Will Be Online
Thursday | October 2 | 6:30pm

46 Joy Street | Beacon Hill | Directions & discounted parking

  Free and open to the public* | Reservations encouraged

 

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, MAAH and Ford Hall Forum present Callie Crossley and three popular anti-racism bloggers in the historic African Meeting House. Crossley, host of WGBH Radio's Under the Radar, moderates a panel with Jay Smooth (The Ill Doctrine), Spectra Speaks (Spectra Speaks), and Andrew Ti (Yo, Is This Racist?) facing the audience for an in-person discussion on the current state of racism and activism in the United States.

 

Topics include how far we’ve come -- or haven’t -- since 1964, what do racism and anti-racism look like from a Millennial perspective, and how do activists relate to those who came before them? This nuanced conversation also will touch upon multiracial contexts, the value of intersectionality, the perils and perks of connecting via the Online community, social media commenting, and more.  (Updates coming soon.)

 

 

The Museum Day Live! Ticket

provides free admission for two people

to MAAH Boston or Nantucket and other venues.

 

In the spirit of Smithsonian Museums, who offer free admission everyday,

Museum Day Live! is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine in which the

Museum of African American History's Boston and Nantucket campuses, and other participating museums

across the country open their doors to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket… for free.

 

Click here to get your free tickets and list of participating museums.

 

2014/2015 Concert Schedule

Click on date for details.

 

September 18, 2014

Jazz for Peace, Love and Prosperity

 

October 2013 (more soon)

History and Meaning of Black Music in Culture

 

November 2013 (more soon)

NEC African American Roots Ensemble

 

December 31, 2014 (more soon)

H+H New Year's Eve Jublilee Concert

 

January 19, 2015 (more soon)

Celebration in Honor of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Concert Review

January 20, 2014

Celebration in Honor of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

March 27, 2014

H+H Women's History Month Concert

June 3, 2014

Shakespeare to Hip Hop

July 30, 2014

The Power of Music for Change

August 13, 2014

From the New World: Legacy of the Spirituals

2013 Concert Review

Click here and scroll down events listing

Give Me


Don't Miss a Moment of

Our Concert Series
with Handel + Haydn Society,
New England Conservatory of Music,
and much more

 

When Boston's free black community began construction on the African Meeting House in 1806, they had a vision. Build a gathering place to worship, to educate children and adults, to abolish slavery, and to engage in all manner of political and cultural life.

At the African Meeting House, they played instruments, sang and studied music for their own religious, antislavery, and personal expressions, as well as for their enjoyment, inspiration and edification. Music accompanied virtually all of their meetings. Among the many performing organizations was the William Lloyd Garrison Juvenile Choir and the Young Men's Harmonic Society. These groups presented concerts from spirituals to Mozart's Marriage of Figaro Overture to rave reviews. A new concert series entitled MAAH Music is filling the Meeting House with music once again beginning this fall.

 

For many years, with the New England Conservatory of Music (NEC), the Museum presented monthly Jazz concerts for which we are eternally grateful to Calvin Hicks who provided leadership, inspiration and fabulous musicians. With historic restoration of the African Meeting House complete, the Museum is pleased to return with the new MAAH Music series of diverse music offered by students and professors from NEC and by the Handel + Haydn Society (H+H), in addition to local and nationally renowned musicians.


For more information
about the MAAH Music series and other upcoming events: 617.725.0022 x22 | history@maah.org

 

Click on a date for each individual concert for event admission fees.

 

Photos from 2013 & 2014 events on Flickr.

 

ONGOING — HISTORIC SITES & WALKING TOURS

 

HISTORIC LANDMARK TOURS  |  EXHIBITS  |  MUSEUM STORE
Hours / Location — 10am-4pm, daily except Sunday; accessible for all. Boston campus: 46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Admission / Exhibit / Tours —
$5: adults, $3: 13-17 and 62+, FREE: MAAH members & kids 12 & under
 

Walk in the footsteps of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Maria Stewart and all the abolitionist
giants who launched a campaign to end slavery in the US.  See how historic restoration of the first African
Meeting House built in 1806 and oldest extant black church building in the nation has returned this
National Historic Landmark to its 1855 appearance, with elegantly curved pews and pulpit, period
wainscoting and finishes, and golden chandelier. Exhibits tell incredible stories of freedom and equality
in the adjacent Abiel Smith School (1835), the first structure built to educate black children.

HOURLY GUIDED TOURS start 11am. Call for current exhibit and tour information: 617.720.2991.

 

BLACK HERITAGE TRAIL®  |  FREE WALKING TOURS
Hours / Location / Tours — Daily, except Sundays. Depart: Robert Gould Shaw and 54th Regiment Memorial;
across from the Massachusetts State House (at Beacon and Park Streets).  Ranger-led tours are FREE to all.
 
Hear amazing stories and explore the history of Boston’s free African American community on the north slope
of Beacon Hill during the 18th and 19th centuries. Interpretive rangers of the National Park Service, Boston
African American National Historic Site (BOAF), lead tours departing from the Robert Gould Shaw
and 54th Regiment Memorial (left) and end at the African Meeting House on MAAH's Boston campus.
Self-guided tour maps are available in the Museum Gift Store, Welcome Center, and online.
AFTER MEMORIAL DAY: 10am, 12pm, 2pmAFTER LABOR DAY: 2pm |  AFTER 12/1: No guided tours AFTER 3/16: 2pm
Call BOAF for information about Faneuil Hall Visitor Center and seasonal group tours: 617.742.5415.

 

PAST EVENTS 2014

 

 

Kenneth J. Cooper

and  

Lucilda Dassardo-Cooper

 

 

 

 


 

This discussion is being recorded

for the Forum Network, a joint venture of

WGBH and The Lowell Institute;

may be available online at

forum-network.organd other

affiliated websites.

 

 

  Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist

            and International Artist on

    Our Journey to Meet Africans in India

                 Thursday | August 28, 2014

           5:00pm | Last Africans in India Guided Exhibit Tour

                   6:00pm Discussion & Slide Presentation

                               Q&A and reception follow

46 Joy Street | Beacon HillDirections & Discount parking

  Admission fees apply*Reservation required

 

The Siddi people living in India today are the descendants of enslaved Africans of centuries past. Award-winning journalist Kenneth J. Cooper and Lucilda Dassardo-Cooper, an American artist of Indian and African ancestry, will recall their moving experiences; his as Washington Post South Asia Bureau Chief, hers through stunning photographs. The couple traveled through the northwestern state of Gujarat, Gandhi's home, to visit the town of Talala and the nearby village of Jumbur, where residents clearly have retained aspects of their African heritage. His article, "Within South Asia, a Little Touch of India," appeared in the Washington Post on April 12, 1999.  It featured postings from New Delhi and reports of other African-descended populations, the Muslim Sheedis of Pakistan and the Catholic "kaffirs" of Sri Lanka. 

 

Our current exhibit, Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers, allowed the Museum to continue the ongoing discussion of freedom rising and explore the history of enslavement, migration, and diverse cultural legacies of Africans in the Indian Ocean World. JoinL'Merchie Frazier, MAAH's Director of Education and Interpretation, for the final guided tour through the exhibit before it closes on August 30 in preparation for Freedom Rising: Reading, Writing and Publishing Black Books,opening in September.

 

Kenneth J. Cooper, a Pulitzer Prize winner, has been a journalist for more than 30 years, specializing in government, politics and social policy, at the Washington Post, Boston Globe, Knight Ridder, St. Louis Post-Dispatch and St. Louis American. In 1984, Cooper, then 28, shared a Pulitzer for special local reporting for “The Race Factor,” a Boston Globe series that examined institutional racism in Boston. He is the youngest African American to win a Pulitzer for journalism, and possibly the youngest to win the prize in any category. <more on Ken | PDF format>

 

Lucilda Dassardo-Cooper has represented the United States in India’s Triennale and exhibited her paintings in such places as Egypt and Jamaica. Her oils on canvas have also been shown at the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Roxbury, as well as the Parish Gallery and Sumner School Museum and Archives, both in Washington, DC. She is a naturalized citizen from Jamaica of Indian and Afro-Caribbean descent. <more on Lucilda | PDF format>

 

Don't miss the last guided tour of the

Africans in India Exhibit

Our current exhibit, Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers, allows the Museum to continue the ongoing discussion of freedom rising and explore the history of enslavement, migration, and diverse cultural legacies of Africans in the Indian Ocean World. Join L'Merchie Frazier, MAAH's Director of Education and Interpretation, for the final guided tour through the exhibit before it closes on August 30. Stay tuned for our next exhibit, Freedom Rising: Reading, Writing and Publishing Black Books, opening in September.

PLEASE RSVP:

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSION:

General Admission: $5;

youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

 

 

 

Jump to MAAH Nantucket's

Free Fun Friday program

Music Workshop on Free Fun Friday:

                A Little History with

            Violist Ashleigh Gordon

         Friday | August 22, 2014 | 11:30am | 1:30pm 

             46 Joy Street | Beacon Hill | Directions & parking

            Free and open to the public | Reservation required
 

Blending nine poems about legendary people, A Little History, and a lot of music creates an interactive educational experience that is loaded with fun. This hour-long workshop is designed for upper elementary-aged students, but enjoyable for all.  It promotes music appreciation and introduces African American historical figures from across the ages:

• Phillis Wheatley (poet)
• Garrett Morgan (inventor)
• Madame CJ Walker (entrepreneur)
• George Washington Carver (farmer)
• Margaret Bonds (composer)
• Ed Bland (composer)
• Angela Davis (activist)
• Bayard Rustin (civil rights leader)
• Barack Obama (president)

 

At the center of this music workshop is A Little History, a new

piece composed by Anthony Green and presented by Ashleigh Gordon, co-founders of Castle of Our Skin. This new work engages students through music, narration, and audience participation, while utilizing the following skills:

* Clapping ostinato rhythmic patterns

* Marching to a clear rhythmic pulse

* Dancing/moving freely

* Singing/playing drones

* Building chords and/or harmonic accompaniment


                       Also gratis on Free Fun Friday...

Come view our current exhibit, Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers; treat yourself to a gift from the Museum Store; or take a guided tour of the historic African Meeting House, led by an interpretive ranger of the National Park Service, Boston African American National HIstoric Site. No reservation required.

RSVP | Information: 617.725.0022, x22

 

 

From the New World:
Legacy of the Spirituals
Boston Landmarks Orchestra Concert

Wednesday | August 13, 2014

Pre-show begins at 6:45pm
Free and open to the public

 

EVENT ALERT:  08/13/2014

Due to severe weather, this concert has been moved to the

Church of the Covenant, 67 Newbury Street, Boston

"Tickets" will be handed out starting at 6pm.  Space is limited; suggest

early arrival. Click here for directions and parking information.


Music Director Christopher Wilkins leads the Boston Landmarks Orchestra in this special concert, presented in partnership with the Museum of African American History. The evening performance features the New England Spiritual Ensemble and young singers from around the region.

 

The show opens with African American spirituals, revered the world over as heartfelt expressions of deepest faith. The Spiritual Ensemble, along with City Singers, the Youth/Teen Choirs at Blessed Mother Teresa Parish and Saint Ann Parish, Blackstone Valley Catholic Youth Choir, and others, will perform anthems of the American experience by American composer Trevor Weston.

 

<Click here for more on the concert, security screening,

and drop off location for people with disabilities.>

 

Accessible for all | Weather alerts: 617-987-2000 | Directions

 

Nedelka Prescod

 

On the

Boston Globe's "To Do List"

for Wednesday

 

Click Here for more on

The History of MAAH Music

2014 Concert Schedule

2013 Concert Review

The Power of Music for Change

Nedelka Prescod's Boston Solo Debut

Wednesday | July 30, 2014 | 6:30pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Reception follows; hosted by NEC Alumni Association

General admission: $10 | Seniors and ages 13 - 17: $5

MAAH members and children under 12: free

Map and discounted parking

 

When the 1964 Freedom Summer voter registration drive kicked off in Mississippi 50 years ago, Nedelka Prescod had not yet been born. However, music of that period influenced her self awareness and her artistry throughout her life. Join us as this award-winning vocalist presents her first Boston solo concert, The Power of Music for Change, which she describes as "an evening of socially conscious music to inspire thought, change, peace, love, and happiness."

 

Prescod will be accompanied by two incredible musicians, Vaughan Francis on keyboards and Parker McAllister on bass. With music from Gil Scott Heron to Pharrell Williams, she will explore the songs that lifted social consciousness and became the backdrop to social change from the Civil Rights Movement through contemporary times. 

 

A rising star at the New England Conservatory, Prescod is an award-winning teacher of voice and choral music, a doctoral candidate, and a performing and recording singer-songwriter and arranger. She recently was honored with NEC's Tourjee' Alumni Scholarship Award for outstanding musicianship, scholarship, and enterprise.  She also has performed with the New England Conservatory Jazz Big Band and is on faculty at the Berklee College of Music.

 

As a contemporary solo artist, Prescod has written, recorded and performed songs in New York, Boston and Florida, and toured internationally as a classical Mezzo-Soprano. In addition to her solo artistry, she has performed background vocals with an array of artists, including R&B, neo-soul, gospel, and hip-hop, and with such legendary jazz performers as Kenny Garrett, Danilo Perez, Fred Hersch, Jason Moran, and Randy Weston.

 

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSION:

General: $10; youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $5;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

Derrick Jackson | Larry Finison

 

 

Kittie Knox at Asbury Park

 

Referee and Cycle Trade Journal (July 18, 1895);

courtesy of Smithsonian Institution Libraries, Washington, DC

 

 

 

Help us thank our co-hosts:

 

           

 

 


 

This discussion is being recorded

for the Forum Network, a joint venture of

WGBH and The Lowell Institute;

may be available online at

forum-network.organd other

affiliated websites.

 

Journalist Interviews Author

on the History of 'Boston's Cycling Craze'

Wednesday | July 16 | 6:00pm

46 Joy Street | Beacon Hill | Boston

Interview | Audience Q&A | Reception

Booksigning | Book available for sale in our Museum Gift Store on 7/15

Admission fees apply* | rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

Don't miss the Boston Globe's Derrick Z. Jackson, an avid cyclist, history buff, photographer, and award-winning Op-Ed columnist, as he interviews author Lorenz "Larry" Finison about his new book, Boston's Cycling Craze, 1880-1900: A Story of Race, Sport and Society. The author and journalist will parley about recreational and competitive athletes of all backgrounds who made Boston a hub of 19th-century bicycling, and introduce some of their descendants in attendance

 

Finison's book shows how these early cyclists interacted on the road and in clubhouses, often constrained by issues of race, class, religion, and gender. The story includes Katherine "Kitty" Knoxa woman of color who challenged conformity with self-styled outfits and insistence on riding a man's bike. "There was no denying that Miss Katie Knox was a card-carrying member of the League of American Wheelman, but her attendance at the annual meeting in 1895 lit a fire that sparked newspaper headlines from coast to coast," wrote the League of American Bicyclists in a 2013 issue of News from the LeagueOnly 21 years old at the time, (Knox) dared to challenge the new 'color bar' instituted... just one year earlier," when, as the article states, "none but white people could become members...." Among the other cyclists featured are Mary Sargent Hopkins, a self-proclaimed expert on women’s cycling and publisher of The Wheelwoman; and Abbot Bassett, a longtime secretary of the League and a vocal cycling advocate for 40 years.

 

An award-winning columnist for the Op-Ed section, Derrick Jackson is a 2001 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in commentary, a two-time winner of opinion awards from the Education Writers Association and a nine-time winner from the National Association of Black Journalists. He also is known for his nature photography, and his images of Barack Obama have been exhibited by Boston’s Museum of African American History.

 

Lorenz Finison is a founding member of Cycling Through History:  The African American Heritage Bike Route, and principal of the public health consulting firm SigmaWorks. “Finison demonstrates that cycling was not immune to the popular prejudices of the day. Not only is this an informative history, but a compelling morality tale that meditates on the important intersection of sport, race, and gender in the broader spectrum of American culture.”

—Thomas Whalen, author of Dynasty’s End: Bill Russell

and the 1968–1969 World Champion Boston Celtics.

 

PLEASE RESERVE YOUR SEAT

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSION:

General Admission: $5;

youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

 

Charles Ogletree

moderator

 

 

Michael Curry

 

 

Avi Green

 

 

Mariama White-Hammond

ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION

 

Professor Charles Ogletree will moderate the discussion with a panel of distinguished leaders sharing critical perspectives on American civil rights and shedding new light on a growing number of controversial "Stand Your Ground" laws. Add your voice during this important forum.

 

Hosting the conversation in the African Meeting House will honor the memory of black and white abolitionists who stood their ground for human rights, just laws, and equal education centuries before the modern civil rights movement.


PANELISTS

Click on their image (left) or name (below) for biographies.

 

  • Charles Ogletree, moderator
    Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Founder and Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, and Founder and Emeritus Director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Harvard Law School.

 

  • Michael Curry
    President of the NAACP Boston Branch; recently elected to serve on the NAACP National Board.

  • Avi Green
    Co-chair of Scholars Strategy Network Working Group on Protecting and Expanding the Right to Vote; former Executive Director (2006 - 2012) of MassVote.

  • Mariama White-Hammond
    Former Executive Director (2001 - 2014) of Project HIP-HOP, which connects Greater Boston-area young people with the living history of the Civil Rights Movement.

 

WGBH FORUM NETWORK

This discussion is being recorded for the Forum Network,

a joint venture of WGBH and The Lowell Institute,

and may be available online on the Forum Network,

forum-network.org, and other affiliated websites.

 

PLEASE RESERVE YOUR SEAT

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSION:

General Admission: $5;

youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

 

Nawab Sidi Muhammad Khan

and his mother

 

 

Albino Mbie,

Guitarist, vocalist, and composer

It's a Party!

In the Africans in India Exhibit

Indian Food | Mozambican Music

Rare Objects Collector

Thursday | June 19, 2014 | 6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Free and open to the public | Donations welcome

 

It is a party!  Come and experience the sights, sounds, and tastes of India as you view Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers, the exhibit that is challenging the way we think of one of the oldest civilizations in the world. 

 

Mozambican musician Albino Mbie, whose recent awards include winning the First Place Prize in the International Songwriting Competition's World Music category, will combine rhythmic patterns and musical concepts from around the world to present his unique Moz-Jazz sound. Aromas and authentic flavors of India will whet your palate, courtesy of One World Cuisine. Kenneth Robbins will share how he and his wife Joyce acquired an impressive collection of objects from the 15th through the 20th centuries, including coins, photographs, playing cards, and toys.
 

The exhibit allows the Museum to continue the ongoing discussion of freedom rising, while we explore the history of enslavement, migration, and diverse cultural legacies of Africans in the Indian Ocean World. Highlights include pictorial panels from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, detailed maps of the world's slave trade routes, and unique artifacts dating back to the 1400s.

 

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

___________________________________________________

 

Partners include:

 

 

One World Cuisine Group

Party food prepared by

Bukhara Indian Bistro

701 Centre St., Jamaica Plain

 

Shapespeare to Hip Hop

 

 

Regie Gibson

 

 

Marlon Carey

Shakespeare to Hip Hop

Performance Poetry featuring

Regie Gibson and Marlon Carey

Tuesday | June 3, 2014

Reception 5:00pm | Concert 6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Q&A follows concert | Admission fees apply*

 

"Intelligent, talented, energetic, hard working, erudite,

articulate, kind and giving, truly gifted artists and most noble

men of faith and honor, you blew us away. Thank you

for sharing so freely and fully of yourselves."

— William L. Burke III, Headmaster, St. Sebastian's School

 

Don't miss Regie Gibson, a National Poetry Slam Champion, and Marlon Carey, aka hip hop poet Inphynit (Infinite).  The spoken word artists, poets, musicians, actors, mentors, and educators extraordinaire have combined their talents and formed Shakespeare to Hip-Hop, an inspirational, informative, and intriguing performance poetry presentation.  The duo creates and adapts writing and performance techniques culled from the study of ancient texts, and fuses them with modern and contemporary spoken word, jazz-poetry, hip-hop and pop-music. Through this, they hope to "further the tradition of the African griots, French troubadors, and Anglo-Saxon bards of the past, bringing the human story to future generations.”  Gibson and Carey use their 20-plus years of performance and classroom experience to inspire students to love words. 

 

Regie Gibson

 

MAAH audiences know Gibson well from performances at such events as the 2011 Rededication of the newly restored African Meeting House, for which he received a standing ovation.  He earned his MFA from New England College, has lectured and performed widely in the U.S., Cuba and Europe. In 2008, he represented the U.S. and won the Absolute Poetry Award Competition in Monfalcone, Italy. He appeared in "love jones,” now a classic film based on events in his life, as well as HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, NPR programs, WGBH’s Art Close-up, and has been published in Poetry Magazine, Harvard’s Divinity Magazine, and numerous others. Gibson also performs regularly with Atlas Soul: a world music ensemble and has recently concluded an Artist/Educator residency at Berklee College of Music. 

 

Marlon Carey

 

Carey has written and taught Poetry and Creative Writing for several years in New England and around the country. He is a member of the 2010 Boston Lizard Lounge Poetry Slam Team, and founder of Providence-based poetry troupe, Brother’s Keeper. In theater, Carey has been in such major plays as The Sunset Limited, Topdog/Underdog, and Shakespeare’s Othello, in which he played the character Lago with great success. He has been favorably reviewed, most recently in When Mahalia Sings with Mixed Magic Theatre, Sortilegio, and Brown University’s Rites and Reason Theatre.

 

rsvp@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x22

 

*ADMISSION: General: $5; youth (13 - 17) and seniors (62+): $3;

MAAH members and children 12 years and under: free.

Teachers and students: free

Governor Deval Patrick

The Heritage Guild

The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy

and the

Museum of African American History

 

Invite you to witness the unveiling of the

Engraved Interpretive Historic Marker

on the site where stood the home of

 

 

First woman of African descent to purchase a house

and land in 17th century Colonial Boston (1670).

 

Tuesday | May 20 | 2014

12noon

 

NEW TIME  1:15pm

Rain or shine

 

Rose Kennedy Greenway 

North End Park

Corner of Hanover Street and the 
John Fitzgerald Surface Artery

 

The Honorable Deval Patrick

Governor of Massachusetts

 

Jesse Brackenbury

Executive Director, Rose Kennedy Greenway

 

Dr. Adelaide Cromwell

President

Heritage Guild and Markers

 

Dr. Vivian Johnson

Researcher

 

Beverly Morgan-Welch

Executive Director, Museum of African American History

 

Music and Refreshments

 

Dr. Vivian R. Johnson

Photo courtesy of The HistoryMakers

Dr. Vivian R. Johnson on

Free, Black and Female

The Zipporah Potter Atkins Story of 

Homeownership in Colonial Boston

 

Thursday, May 22      6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Lecture | Q&A | Reception

In early Colonial Boston, Zipporah Potter Atkins was free when most Africans were enslaved; propertied when most women were not; and had six surnames when last names were rarely used for people of African descent.  Who is this little-known woman whose 17th century house-site recently was designated for an Historic Interpretive Marker on what is now the Rose Kennedy Greenway? 

During a five-year period, Dr. Vivian R. Johnson, retired BU education professor, engaged in a challenging document search uncovering evidence of Zipporah Potter Atkins’ extraordinary life during Boston’s first 75 years.  Learn about this unusual North End resident in a Lecture at the African Meeting House, the center of Boston’s free black community in the 19th century.  Admission fees apply.

SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF BELLE

 

presented by

 

Museum of African American History

 

WCVB TV’s CityLine

 

Color of Film Collaborative

 

Museum of Fine Arts

 

Searchlight Films

 

RESERVATIONS AND PASSES REQUIRED

 

MAAH Guests click below.

Enter MAAH as code to download your pass.

 

MAAH

This new film is inspired by the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu Mbatha-Raw in her film debut), daughter of an enslaved African woman and British Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode).  Belle is raised in England by aristocratic great-uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) and his wife (Emily Watson), yet her African heritage prevents her from achieving noble social standing.  After meeting an idealistic young vicar’s son bent on changing society, he and Belle help shape Mansfield’s role as Lord Chief Justice to end slavery in England.  Following the film:

Karen Holmes Ward

Host and Executive Producer of CityLine

will moderate a panel discussion and Q&A with the audience

featuring

 

L’Merchie Frazier

MAAH’s Director of Education and Interpretation

 

Professor Sheldon Cheek

Senior Curatorial Associate,

The Image of the Black in Western Art Project,

Hutchins Center at Harvard University

 

Space is limited; reservations and passes required.

 

MAAH Annual Meeting with

Dr. Craig Steven Wilder

 

Dr. Craig Steven Wilder
Professor, Scholar, Author on
Ebony and Ivy:

Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History

of America's Universities

Wednesday, April 23      6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Annual Meeting | Free and open to the public

Dr. Craig Steven Wilder's new book, Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities (New York: Bloomsbury, 2013) is the first of its kind -- a powerful and propulsive study revealing a history of oppression behind the institutions usually considered the cradle of liberal politics. In Ebony and Ivy, Dr. Wilder lays bare uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy.

A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed that institution's complex and contested involvement in slavery -- setting off a controversy that leapt from the ivory tower to make headlines across the country. But Brown's troubling past was far from unique. The slave trade funded colleges, built campuses, and paid the wages of professors. Many of America's revered colleges and universities -- from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and UNC -- were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color.

From a community organizer in the South Bronx to a professor, author and scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Wilder is a rising star in the profession of history whose career trajectory has already earned such recognition as Columbia's University Medal of Excellence.

To be recorded by WGBH Forum Network.

 

CLICK TO RSVP

or call

Space is limited  |  617.725.0022, x222  |  Accessible for all

 

DISCOUNTED PARKING | MAP & DIRECTIONS

 

Pauline Viardot-Garci

1821 - 1910

 

 

 

handelandhaydn.org

National Women's Month

Concert with H+H

Thursday, March 27      7:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

General admission: $20  | Museum members: $10*

 

Come celebrate National Women's History Month in the African Meeting House with Handel + Haydn Society presenting music by Beethoven and renowned women composers Clara Schumann, Fanny Mendelssohn, and Pauline Viardot. H+H mezzo-soprano Margaret Lias joins violinist Susanna Ogata and fortepianist Ian Watson will perform for this chamber recital.

 

H+H reaches the community through exciting partnerships with some of Boston’s premier institutions, including the Boston Children’s Museum, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Boston Public Library, New England Conservatory, and the Museum of African American History. Through the H+H Heartstrings program, public school students, education program families, and other underserved communities receive free and discounted tickets to subscription series concerts, ensuring that the enjoyment of live music is accessible to all.


CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE

$10 discount code for MAAH Members:  MAAH10

$7 surcharge will be added to online purchases

 

PURCHASE TICKETS AT MUSEUM STORE

46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

 

PURCHASE TICKETS AT H+H BOX OFFICE

300 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston

 

CLICK HERE TO RSVP & PURCHASE TICKETS AT THE DOOR

or call

Space is limited  |  617.725.0022, x222  |  Accessible for all

 

DISCOUNTED PARKING | MAP & DIRECTIONS

 

BOOK PARTY:

 

Dr. Cheryl Janifer LaRoche

 

 

The Underground Railroad

 

The Underground Railroad was neither underground nor a railroad. It got its name because its activities had to be carried out in secret, using darkness or disguise, and because railway terms were used to describe how "conductors" helped self-emancipated people travel from “station” to “station.” Those who most actively assisted in their escape by way of the "railroad” were members of the free black community, Northern abolitionists, philanthropists and church leaders.

Dr. Cheryl LaRoche

    Professor, Scholar, Author on

Free Black Communities and the
Underground Railroad:

The Geography of Resistance

Thursday, March 20      6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Lecture, Q&A, Book signing, Reception  |  Admission fees apply

 

“Employing the tools of archeology, LaRoche’s study provides

a powerful new window into the Underground Railroad and significantly

enriches our understanding of it. She helps rescue some of the crucial Underground Railroad lore that scholars have been attempting

to substantiate or refute for more than a century.”

—Keith Griffler, author of Front Line of Freedom:

African Americans and the Forging of the

Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley

 
Rich in oral histories, maps, memoirs, and archaeological investigations,
Dr. Cheryl Janifer LaRoche
's highly anticipated new book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad, examines the “geography of resistance” and tells the powerful, and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression.

 

This enlightening study uncovers a new historical perspective on pathways to freedom from enslavement. Unlike previous histories of the Underground Railroad, which have concentrated on "frightened fugitive slaves" and their benevolent abolitionist accomplices, LaRoche focuses instead on free African American communities — and the crucial help they provided to individuals fleeing slavery, and the terrain where those flights to freedom occurred. Outstanding among them was Boston's powerful community on the north slope of Beacon Hill, considered the nexus of the abolitionist movement. 

 

Exploring the religious and fraternal institutions at the heart of these free black communities, LaRoche demonstrates how the AME and Baptist churches and Prince Hall Masons, in addition to Quakers, provided both physical and social structures that fostered escape from slavery. LaRoche shows how landscape features, such as waterways, iron forges, and caves, played a key role in the conduct and effectiveness of the Underground Railroad.  

 

Dr. LaRoche, a lecturer in American studies at the University of Maryland, also has served as a consultant for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, archaeological conservator for the African Burial Ground Project in New York City, and a history scholar for the Museum of African American History.  In 2011, The Society for Historical Archaeology awarded her the John L. Cotter Award for exemplary work in the study of African American archaeology.

 

Dr. LaRoche's book will be available in the Museum Store.
This program will be recorded by the WGBH Forum Network.

CLICK TO RSVP

and earn a chance to win a free autographed copy of

Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad

or call

Space is limited  |  617.725.0022, x222  |  Accessible for all

 

MUSEUM ADMISSIONS

 

DISCOUNTED PARKING | MAP & DIRECTIONS

Image: Dr. Louis Wilson, Professor, Scholar, Author

 

Dr. Louis Wilson

and his best selling book

Dr. Louis Wilson

    Professor, Scholar, Authoron

The Americans

Thursday, February 27     6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Lecture, Q&A, Book signing, Reception

Admission fees apply

 

Join us for The Americans, an engaging presentation by Dr. Louis Wilson
on the book that is inspiring a new generation of history and social science enthusiasts.  Educators, parents, students and history buffs will all enjoy this program. 
With diverse personal accounts, literature, cartoons, current events, and podcasts among interactive features, the book is changing the way students connect with the past, and helping them realize the richness of our nation's history.

 

Dr. Wilson, Director of African Studies and Professor of Afro-American Studies, Smith College, has documented African American and Native American men from Rhode Island who fought in the Revolutionary War and, because of his scholarship, a monument will be erected in their memory.

 

His most recent published works include an article in the book Love Across the Color Lineand The Americans (co-authored, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012). The high school American history curriculum supports the intent of the Common Core State Standards with rigor, skills, and document-based instruction. 

 

Dr. Wilson has been a senior Fulbright researcher at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and a visiting professor of American Studies at the University of Hamburg.

 

African Music Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

necmusic.edu/

 

A Tribute to Dr. Ephraim Amu:

The Father of Ghanaian Art Music

Thursday, February 20, 2014      6:00pm

46 Joy Street  |  Beacon Hill  |  Boston

Concert, Talk and Reception | Free and open to the public

 

“There is no single individual who has influenced the

course of the development of art music in contemporary

Ghana as much as Dr. Ephraim Amu.”

— J.H. Kwabena Nketia

African scholar

 

Join us as we celebrate the life, leadership, and music of Dr. Ephraim Amu (1899-1995) and help introduce the renowned composer’s daughter

Misonu Amu to Boston.  This MAAH Music presentation on February 20 in the historic African Meeting House will kick off the 2014 African Music Festival, a two-day series of performances and workshops hosted by New England Conservatory (NEC) and Tufts University Music Department (February 21-22 at NEC and Tufts).  

 

Misonu, with NEC's Dr. Felicia Sandler

(left) and an ensemble of NEC students, will perform a concert of her father’s choral music, which speaks meaningfully to the conscience of his nation.  She will present hand-crafted instruments that she brought from Ghana.  

 

Insights about Dr. Amu, the man and his music, will be provided by Dr. George Worlasi Kwasi Dor, University of Mississippi, whose symposium presentation the following day focuses on Amu’s treatment of language as a major generative force and determinant of style, especially in his mature choral works, and his creative ingenuity in forging a synthesis between Western art music and traditional African music into

Ghana’s intercultural art choral idiom.

 

 

 

 

Click here

for more details about

Boston's MLK Day Tribute. 

 

Click here

for more on keynote speaker

Judy Richardson.

 

Click here

for more on community leader

Michael Curry.

 

Click here

for more on community leader

The Honorable Geraldine Hines.

Museum of African American History,

Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras

and the

Mayor's Office of Arts, Tourism,

and Special Events

invite you to the annual

Day of Service and Celebration in Honor of

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Monday January 20, 2014, 1:00pm

Historic Faneuil Hall  |  Free and open to the pubic

Concert and storytelling |  Reception follows

 

Please join Boston's new mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Museum's
Beverly Morgan-Welch, and distinguished community leaders who will evoke the power and promise of the Civil Rights leader and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964. Conductor Marta Zurad will lead young musicians from Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras Intensive Community Program in a moving array of classical music, spirituals, and freedom songs. The day's festivities culminate with the traditional audience sing-a-long.

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER


 

Judy Richardson
Civil Rights Activist and Documentary Filmmaker
Credits include Academy Award-nominated Eyes on the Prize and
Emmy and Peabody Award-winning Malcolm X: Make It Plain

 

 

Judy Richardson (center), December 1963, at an Atlanta sit-in at the

segregated Toddle House Restaurant before all were arrested.

 

COMMUNITY LEADERS

 


Michael A. Curry, Esq.
President, Boston NAACP

The Honorable Geraldine Hines
Massachusetts Appeals Court

Farrah Ridore
Alumni, BYSO Intensive Community Program
Sophomore, Drew University

 

PAST EVENTS 2013

 

 

 

 

Jubilee Concert
in the Museum's historic

African Meeting House

on Beacon Hill

 

 

handelandhaydn.org

Jubilee Concerts with H&H
Music and Storytelling on New Year's Eve

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

1:00pm and 2:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

 

On New Year's day in 1863, Frederick Douglass said that he "finally knew joy!"

 

Join us for an afternoon of music and storytelling to commemorate the anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation with a concert by the Handel and Haydn Society (H&H) and stories by the Museum.

 

Discover Boston's role in this historic event and the part H&H played more than 150 years ago during Jubilee Celebrations on January 1, 1863. Let the music played to celebrate freedom inspire you, with works including the Battle Hymn of the Republic written by H&H member, Julia Ward Howe. Feel the anticipation that was palpable awaiting this official document at a time when the nation was in the midst of a Civil War.

 

Scott Allen Jarrett, conductor

Jessica Petrus, soprano
Teresa Wakim, soprano
Margaret Lias, alto
Reginald Mobley, alto
Marcio de Oliveira, tenor
Stefan Reed, tenor
Jacob Cooper, bass
David McFerrin, bass

Beverly Morgan-Welch, narrator

Allen/Merman 
Precious Lord, Take My Hand

Dresel
Dr. O.W. Holmes' Army Hymn

Mendelssohn
"He that shall endure to the end" from Elijah

Methfessel Hymn

Steffe/Ward Howe
Battle Hymn of the Republic

Handel
"Hallelujah" Chorus from Messiah

 

$5 general admission or

Free to first 50 First Night button holders and to all MAAH Members.

 

Tickets available in our Museum Store,

46 Joy Street, Becaon Hill, Monday - Saturday, 10:00am - 4:00pm.

Advance tickets also available at H&H Box Office, 617.266.3605.

 

Space is limited | RSVP@maah.org | 617.725.0022 x222 | Directions

Kwanzaa Workshop
Music, drumming, and storytelling

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 10:30am
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

Free admission to workshop  |  Group reservations required.

 

Join us for an interactive presentation on the seven principles of Kwanzaa. Participate in this celebration of African American heritage, spirit, music, and culture with Brother Rumas Barrett, who traveled to Haiti, Senegal, and Mexico to develop his artistic talents.


The leader of this family-friendly workshop founded the Life Symphony Orchestra, a group of professional multi-media and performing artists with more than 30 years of community service through live performance and theatre arts training. Brother Rumas, who premiered the orchestra
at Berklee
Performance Center in 1982, continues to enrich the lives of youth and families around New England and beyond by presenting talented performing artists through music, song, dance and the
spoken word.

 

Kwanzaa was created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor and chairman of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach, as a means to bring African-Americans together as a community. He started by researching and combining aspects of several different African "first fruit" or harvest celebrations to form the basis of Kwanzaa.  Come and learn how to bring this celebration into your holiday season.

 

African American Roots Ensemble

during a previous concert

 

 

necmusic.edu/

NEC's African American Roots Ensemble
Where African Rhythms and

Western Music Meet

Friday, November 22, 2013 7:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Free and open to the public


The African American experience as presented by the a cappella music of the African American Roots Ensemble, traces the history of black music from its origins in Africa across the seas and into American culture. Join us for a delightful performance and learn how spirituals, jazz, blues, ragtime, R&B, soul, gospel and other music genres derive from traditional African rhythms and Western music influences.

 

Four outstanding vocalists from the Roots Ensemble comprise the Earth Tones quartet, also featured in this concert. The ensemble and the quartet are rooted in tradition, yet current in expression, and honor the story of African peoples and their great contributions to the world through music and culture. Both are extensions of the Contemporary Improvisation Department at the New England Conservatory of Music, which offers a variety of ensembles that are open to all students. Look forward to more wonderful music from NEC in 2014.

 

PROGRAM DETAILS TO BE ANNOUNCED.

Space is limited  |  rsvp@maah.org   |   (617) 725-0022 x222

Admission, Map, Directions & Validated Parking |  Accessible for all.

Sgt. Major Lewis Douglass

Frederick Douglass' son was among

the 54th Regiment soldiers who marched.

 

 

Dr. John Stauffer

Freedom Song: 

Battle Hymn of the Republic

with Dr. John Stauffer

Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 6:00pm

[Postponed from October 24]

MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

Q&A, Booksigning, and Reception follow

Admission fees apply

 

John Brown's Body was sung by the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, the first black troops from the north in the Civil War, as they marched through the streets of Boston on their way to South Carolina. Julia Ward Howe gave the popular tune new life as The Battle Hymn of the Republic, earning it a profoundly significant and contradictory place in America's history and cultural memory.

Dr. John Stauffer will review his latest book, The Battle Hymn of the Republic:
A Biography of the Song That Marches On
, coauthored by Benjamin Soskis, and show how this Civil War tune has become an anthem for diverse causes over the centuries.  Their sweeping study of the Battle Hymn, traces the song's evolution from antebellum revivalism, with the melody of the camp-meeting favorite, Say Brothers, Will You Meet Us. Union soldiers in the Civil War then turned it into John Brown's Body. Then Julia Ward Howe, uncomfortable with Brown's violence and militancy, wrote the words we know today. 

 

Dr. Stauffer is a leading authority on antislavey, social protest movements, and interracial friendship, and is Chair of History and Literature (Fall 2013), and Professor of English, American Studies, and African and African American Studies at Harvard University.  He is author of several books and more than 45 articles, including this critically acclaimed work on The Battle Hymn.

 

Space is limited  |  rsvp@maah.org   |   (617) 725-0022 x222

Admission, Map, Directions & Validated Parking |  Accessible for all.

 

 

Vocalists Pamela Dellal (above)

and Dana Whiteside

 

Of Poetry and Politics:

Music at the Time of the Civil War

Featuring

Mezzo-soprano Pamela Dellal

and

Baritone Dana Whiteside

Saturday  |  November 2, 2013  |  4:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

MAAH Members discount — tickets half price!

 

Music in America at the time of the Civil War abounded in the works of both European and American composers. Musicians of the Old Post Road’s Silver Anniversary season kicks off with this concert by great musical innovators and shines a light on music that was made and heard from the mid-1700s through the time of the Civil War. The program, performed on a 19th-century piano and other period instruments in the Museum's beautiful and historic African Meeting House, offers a marvelous mix of popular and art music echoing the changes that swept across the land.  Featured are works from Beethoven and Liszt to Stephen Foster and the African-American piano virtuoso and composer Thomas Wiggins, with compelling vocal soloists Pamela Dellal and Dana Whiteside.

 

Space is limited  |  617.720.2991  |  Accessible for all

Map, Directions & Validated Parking

 

More on 12 Years a Slave

 

Fox Searchlight Pictures in association with the
Museum of African American History and 

WCVB-TV's CityLine cordially invite you and
a guest to a special advance screening of

12 Years a Slave


Critically acclaimed film

by Steve McQueen

Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 7:00pm

AMC Loews Boston Common

175 Tremont Street, Boston, MA


Introduction by Karen Holmes Ward
Director of Public Affairs and Community Services, and host of CityLine
Historical context by Beverly Morgan-Welch
Executive Director, Museum of African American History

____________________

 

And don't miss...

Beverly Morgan-Welch on 'CityLine'

Show title: The film ‘12 Years a Slave’

Sunday, October 20 at 12 noon on WCVB/Channel 5

 

 

 

Handel and Haydn Society
in the African Meeting House Boston

 

 

 

handelandhaydn.org

H&H Joins MAAH Music Series

with HIP Performance and

Music by Namesakes

Thursday, October 17, 2013, 7:00pm

MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill


The MAAH Music series continues with the debut of Handel and Haydn Society (H&H) presenting a vibrant program of vocal and instrumental classics by H&H's namesake composers, George Frideric Handel and Franz Joseph Haydn. Founded in Boston in 1815, H&H is considered America's oldest continuously performing arts organization, celebrating its Bicentennial in 2015.

 

The Museum of African American History welcomes this new partnership with Handel and Haydn to bring vibrant chamber music to the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill.  H&H, recognized internationally as a leader in the field of historically informed performance (HIP), creates opportunities to hear the unique textures and dynamics of period instruments and orchestrations. 

 

Space is limited  |  617.725.0022 x222

*MAAH MEMBERS' DISCOUNT MAY BE APPLIED AT CHECK OUT.

Information  |  email: history@maah.org  |  (617) 725-0022, x222

Map, Directions & Validated Parking  |  Accessible for all.

 

Ambassador Luis CdeBaca,
    Senior Advisor to the
   U.S. Secretary of State

 

STAY TUNED FOR

A NEW DATE IN 2014!

Human Trafficking
with Ambassador Luis CdeBaca

POSTPONED

Monday, October 7, 2013, 6:00pm


The Museum of African American History regrets to inform you of another impact of the United States government shutdown, State Department travel. As a result, Ambassador Luis CdeBaca, Special Advisor to Secretary of State John Kerry, is not able to be with us Monday evening for his important presentation on Human Trafficking today. We will notify you as soon as this program has been rescheduled.

Although the institution of slavery has been outlawed, human trafficking continues in the United States and around the world.  The Museum’s historic African Meeting House on the north slope of Beacon Hill, where gatherings to campaign against slavery in the 19th century were held, hosts a lecture on the complexities of today’s human trafficking.  Join us for Ambassador Luis CdeBaca, U.S. Department of State, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, to hear an enlightening presentation on the realities of freedom seekers in the 21st century. The program will draw similarities between the 19th century Abolitionist Movement and current campaigns to combat human trafficking.

WATCH FOR THIS EVENT TO BE RESCHEDULED.

For more information | history@maah.org |617.725.0022 x222

 

Nedelka Prescod

NEC teacher and doctoral student

 

Stay tuned

For announcements

about future NEC concerts.

 

 

necmusic.edu/

MAAH Music presents

NEC Contemporary Music Showcase

Jazz, R&B, funk, neo-soul, spirituals and more.

Friday, September 27, 2013, 7:00pm

MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Free and open to the public



Stylized renditions of music by artists ranging from Nina Simone and Ray Charles to Sting and Destiny's Child, complemented by original compositions and contemporary improvisation, will kick off the MAAH Music series. Nedelka Prescod (listen), teaching and pursuing doctoral studies in jazz at the New England Conservatory of Music (NEC), will perform and showcase gifted and talented vocal and instrumental undergraduate and graduate students presenting this evening of jazz, R&B, funk, neo-soul, spirituals and more. Concert co-organizer Akenya Seymour (listen) is one of many students featured who are members of NEC's African American Student Union, an open forum to engage audiences of all backgrounds.


Space is limited |RSVP@maah.org |617.725.0022 x222

 

Admissions, Map & Directions | Accessible for all.

 

Did you miss this event?

 

Not to worry...

 

View photos

from this event on the

MAAH Flickr page.

I Have A Dream
50th Anniversary Tribute
Public Reading of the Words of the
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at 12noon
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Free and open to the public

On this milestone anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, we invite you to join Boston Civil Rights activists and community leaders to become one of the readers of Dr. King's iconic speech. Stand in the pulpit of the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill, where the abolitionist giants advocated for civil rights during the 19th century, and allow your voice to bring
Dr. King's powerful words to life.

Vocalist Rashad McPherson, Minister of Music at Boston's Bethel A.M.E. Church, and founder and leader of gospel singing group DivinePURPOSE, will present a
musical tribute to the Civil Rights leader.  

 

We also pay tribute to Civil Rights leaders

by offering free admission all day.

Space is limited |RSVP@maah.org |617.725.0022 x222

Map & Directions |Accessible for all.

Eric Jackson
The Power of Black Music:
From the Underground Railroad through
the Civil Rights Movement

Wednesday, July 31, 2013 at 6:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus  |  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Lecture, exhibit and reception
Admission fees apply*  |  Discounted parking*
Arrive early and explore the Museum
Freedom Rising exhibit and store open at 5:00pm

WGBH Radio Host Eric Jackson will trace the roots and the significant role of black music in movements of organized resistance.  From the Abolitionist Movement through the Civil War and Civil Rights to present day melodies, music was and continues to be the soundtrack and inspiration for incredible campaigns for freedom and justice.  

 

Jackson will provide insights into spirituals, blues, gospel, jazz, R&B and rap.  He will play a sampling of tunes, tracing interesting lineages, exploring lyrics that reflect the times, examining phrasing that carries the music and messaging that has been delivered in song for nearly two centuries. 

Boston Magazine called Jackson “the dean of the Boston jazz scene for 25 years.” He was the recipient of the 2012 Duke Dubois Humanitarian Award, JazzWeek‘s prestigious lifetime achievement award named for the late jazz radio promoter, broadcasting pioneer, and mentor to many, including Jackson himself. 

Eric in the Evening is Boston’s signature jazz program, featuring the best in jazz, in-depth looks at great artists, live interviews, and live performances from Scullers Jazz Club, airing Friday – Sunday from 9pm to midnight. 

Continue the conversation after the lecture...
Reception immediately follows.
Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | 617.725.0022 x222
Admission  |  Map & Directions  |  Discounted Parking
Accessible for all.

Dr. Cheryl LaRoche

 

General Harriet Tubman

 

Lewis Hayden

Dr. Cheryl LaRoche

Underground Railroad Paths to
Freedom in the North
Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 6:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
A Lowell Lecture Series Presentation
Free and open to the public
Reception follows

Renowned archaeologist, Dr. Cheryl LaRoche uses the tools of archaeology to uncover new historical perspectives on the Underground Railroad.  She reads the landscape as a document.  Her different approach brings new insights to the Underground Railroad network of individuals and families in the northern United States that led self-emancipated peoples to cities like Boston.  She will consider the deeper meaning of freedom beyond the hair-raising and thrilling stories we associate with the Underground Railroad.

 

Moving from New Hampshire to the Mississippi River and beyond, Dr. LaRoche has been researching and physically exploring the landscapes of 18th and 19th century free Black communities, and studying the relationship between escape from slavery and African American institutions — including churches, schools, Prince Hall Masons, families, and other social structures.  The Museum's African Meeting House and Abiel Smith School in Boston are two such institutions.  Dr. LaRoche's work has exposed the invisible support systems that buttressed the secret operation.  A new geography of resistance is arising from this approach. 

 

Dr. LaRoche, a lecturer in American studies at the University of Maryland, also has served as a consultant for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, and an archaeological conservator for the African Burial Ground Project in New York City.  In 2011, The Society for Historical Archaeology awarded her the John L. Cotter Award for exemplary work in the study of African American archaeology.  Her first book Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance is sheduled to be published early next year. 

 

Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | (617) 725-0022 x222

Map, Directions & Parking

Accessible for all.

_____________________________________

 

Committee Aids the Self Emancipated


A group of Boston leaders, comprised of black and white men, reported on their fundraising activities on behalf of self-liberated men, women, and children.

"The amount thus raised from all the sources was $6,028, and this sum has been expended for the relief of fugitives.... The result to be reported to the public is that more than four hundred fugitives have been aided by their beneficence..."

The Liberator, February 18, 1859

Boston was a destination for many who bravely fled their enslavers. Join us on Thursday, June 20 to learn more about Pathways to Freedom in the North; details follow.

Click here for an excerpt of the Committee Report.

 

Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez

Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez
Memory and Storytelling:
Remembering Our History and Ourselves
2013 Annual Meeting
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at 6:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Free and open to the public
Reception follows

Join the Museum's board, staff, and members for an enjoyable evening to celebrate the Museum with Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez, Senior Vice President of Historic Sites at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  He believes in the power of memory and the transformative power of storytelling, and surmises that remembering our history and ourselves whole makes us subjects and places us into the continuum of history. 

 

Dr. Rael-Gálvez will pull back the layers of stories, like that of Estevanico, a Moorish slave who in 1539 encountered the A:shiwi (Ahh-SHE-we) or Zuni people in Hawikuu, New Mexico.  According to the National Museum of the American Indian, "it appears that the first nonindigenous contact with the people of North America was actually made by an African." 

 

Prior to joining the National Trust, Dr. Rael-Gálvez was Executive Director of the National Hispanic Cultural Center, a 51-acre campus in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which includes an art museum, a performing arts center, an archive and library, and vibrant Education Department. He earned a B.A. in English Literature and Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American Cultures at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he completed an award-winning dissertation on American Indian slavery and identity in the Southwest.  Dr. Rael-Gálvez has dedicated his career to raising consciousness, fostering community and inspiring creativity.

 

Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | (617) 725-0022 x222

 

Map, Directions & Parking

Accessible for all.

Image: Dr. Sara Lawrence - Lightfoot seated

Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot

Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot

Respect: Witness and Justice
Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 6:00pm

MAAH Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

A Lowell Lecture Series Presentation
Free and open to the public
Reception follows

 

Respect is commonly seen as deference to status and hierarchy, as driven by duty and a desire to avoid punishment, shame, or embarrassment. Renowned Harvard sociologist and MacArthur Prize winner Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot will challenge the traditional concept and present a view that draws its contours from the African-American historic journey of liberation, and focuses on the ways that respect creates equality, empathy and connection in all kinds of relationships. She will argue that respect is the single most powerful ingredient in building just and democratic communities and productive organizational cultures. 

 

Dr. Lawrence-Lightfoot will also challenge us to think deeply and act courageously as we advocate for human dignity and social justice, as we nourish our personal and professional relationships, and as we build inclusive and diverse communities where everyone has visibility and voice. 

 

Educator, researcher, author, and public intellectual, Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot has been on faculty at Harvard University since 1972.  Among her many honors is the Emily Hargroves Fisher endowed chair, which upon her retirement becomes the Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot chair, making her the first African-American woman in Harvard's history to have an endowed professorship named in her honor.   

 

She has written ten books, including Balm In Gilead: Journey of A Healer (1988), which won the 1988 Christopher Award, given for "literary merit and humanitarian achievement.”  In Respect: An Exploration (1999), Lawrence-Lightfoot reaches deep into human experience to find the essence of this powerful quality. 

 

Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | (617) 725-0022 x222

Image:  Freedom Rising - Harriet Tubman, Charlotte Forten, and Susie King Taylor

Image:  Civil war, Black young man, Union Drummer

Image:  Dr. Lois Brown

 

Dr. Lois Brown

Freedom Rising Exhibit Opening
Lecture, Exhibit and Reception

Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 3:00pm 

MAAH Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

MAAH welcomes descendants of abolitionists and of the first black regiments from the north in the Civil War, including the granddaughter of Henry A. Monroe, drummer 54th Massachusetts Regiment, to celebrate our new exhibit.

 

Featuring

 

Dr. Lois Brown

 

‘The mission she now has in view':

Harriet Tubman and Women of the Civil War

 

A Lowell Lecture Series Presentation
Free and open to the public
Reception follows

 

The Civil War was shaped by countless heroes and heroines, among them the legendary leader known to thousands as "General Tubman." Among these were stalwart, visionary, and courageous African American women who came from free and formerly enslaved families, from Northern communities and Southern homes.  In what ways does our knowledge of the war change when we consider the leadership, enterprise, and witness of Harriet Tubman, Charlotte Forten, and Susie King Taylor?  As we mark the centennial anniversary of Harriet Tubman's passing, there is much to be gained by studying the intrepid women who navigated real and symbolic battlefields and front lines of the Civil War.  This program includes a special tribute to General Harriet Tubman.

Dr. Lois Brown is Class of 1958 Distinguished Professor of the African American Studies Program and Department of English at Wesleyan University.  Her research andscholarship focus on African American and New England literary history and culture. She is widely respected for her research, teaching and scholarship, including 19th century African American and American literature and culture, and abolitionist narratives. Dr. Brown's passion for African American history has led to exhibitions at MAAH and at the Boston Public Library. She has curated or co-curated more than five exhibitions, and is one of the curators of Freedom Rising.

Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | (617) 725-0022 x222

 

Touré

Movies: Lincoln, Django and the

Portrayal of Blacks in Period Films

 

 

Image:  Touré

Saturday, February 23 at 5:00pm
MAAH Boston Campus: 
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

A Lowell Lecture Series Presentation
Free and open to the public
Reception follows

Boston's own Touré now hosts The Cycle, weekdays on MSNBC. He is a columnist for Time.com, popular culture critic, and author of four books including the critically acclaimed Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?   His latest work, I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon, is scheduled to be released March 2013. Touré will share his insights into some of today's most talked about films; suggests viewing films in advance.  [Left: images from Lincoln by Steven Spielberg; Right: images from Django by Quentin Tarentino; Touré: courtesy of touré.com.]

Space is limited  |  RSVP@maah.org  | (617) 725-0022 x222

Image:  Freedom Rising - Frederick Douglass, John Brown and Abraham Lincoln

Join the

Museum of African American History

National Park Service

Boston African American National Historic Site

 

for

 

 Dr. John Stauffer

 

Giants of Abolition:

Frederick Douglass, John Brown

and Abraham Lincoln

Thursday, January 31 at 6pm
MAAH Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

A Lowell Lecture Series Presentation

Free and open to the public
Book signing and reception follow
 

This first event with Dr. Stauffer launches the Freedom Rising Lowell Lecture Series and the Museum's yearlong commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and of the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, the first black soldiers from the north to serve in the Civil War.  Through a new exhibit, lectures, concerts, Teacher Summer Institutes, and children’s events, Freedom Rising in 2013 celebrates the roles of Boston’s black and white abolitionists in monumental historic events.

 

Dr. Stauffer is a leading authority on antislavery, social protest movements, and interracial friendship, and is a Harvard University professor of English and American Literature and African American Studies, and Chair of the History of American Civilization program at Harvard.  He is the author of several books and more than 45 articles, including The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race (2002), which won four major awards.  His essays have appeared in such publications as Time Magazine, New York Post, 21st: The Journal of Contemporary Photography, and The Harvard Review, and he has appeared on national radio and television shows. 

 

Two of Dr. Stauffer’s books are available for advance purchase online, including Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, and his new release The Tribunal: John Brown and the Road to Emancipation. The book signing and reception follow the lecture. 

 

Click here to purchase Dr. Stauffer’s books

And have them held for you at the Museum store.

 

Space is limited ~ rsvp@maah.org

 

For more information

617.725.0022, extension 222

Image:  MAAH and BOAF logos

Image:  Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra - Text:  A Day of Service and Celebration in Honor of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

presented by

 

Museum of African American History

Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra

Mayor's Office of Arts, Tourism, and Special Events

MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 2013

1pm in Faneuil Hall

Free and open to the general public

 

Doors open at 11am for public viewing of
Presidential Inauguration

Reception follows the concert

Join us for music and spoken word tributes to Dr. King

featuring

Image: Flyer, "A day of service and celebration in honor of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - 2013"
Image:  Ernest G. Green, Little Rock Nine

 

Ernest G. Green, Keynote Speaker
Member of the Little Rock Nine, black students
first to integrate a public school following the 1954
Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision

 

2013 Distinguished Leaders

 

Image:  Gilmore, White-Hammond, Gibson

L to R: Gilmore, White-Hammond and Gibson

Marvin Gilmore, Military Leader

One of the most highly decorated American veterans from WWII, first African American in New England

to be awarded the Legion of Honor from France, and successful developer of major industrial projects.

Rev. Dr. Gloria White-Hammond, Humanitarian Leader

Co-founder of Bethel AME Church, pediatrician, medical and human rights missionary with many

years of community service in Boston and human rights advocacy around the world.

Regie Gibson, Oratory Leader

Poet, songwriter, actor, author, educator, and National Poetry Slam Champion who has lectured 

and performed widely in the US, Cuba, and Europe.

 

Image:  Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra Members (Close Up)

 

BYSO Intensive Community Program

Performing classical music, spirituals and freedom songs conducted by Marta Zurad

 

As 2013 is the Sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and of the
Massachusetts 54th Regiment, the first black soldiers from the north to serve in the Civil War,
the Mayor's Office and BYSO join the Museum in commemorating the 150th anniversary of
President Abraham Lincoln's signing of the historic document and to the brave
black regiments through this year's Martin Luther King Day celebration.

Boston's 11th annual tribute to Dr. King features music students from BYSO's

Intensive Community Program.  The distinguished leaders will evoke the power and

promise of the civil rights hero by reading from his Emancipation Proclamation

Centennial Address delivered in New York City in 1962.  The event also will

recognize the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream"

speech delivered in 1963 in the shadow of the

Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

   

Visit cityofboston.gov/arts for more information.

2012 Events

Image:  Interior of African Meeting House (Black and White) - 150th Anniversary, First Night Jubilee Concert

presented by the

Museum of African American History

and the

Handel and Haydn Society 

 

December 31, 2012 

Performances at 2pm and 3pm  

 46 Joy Street    Beacon Hill

Join us on New Year's Eve to celebrate the Sesquicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation with a concert by the Handel and Haydn Society Chorus and the story of Boston's role in this historic event presented by the Museum. This special First Night concert includes selections from H&H's performance on January 1, 1863 and abolitionist songs including the Battle Hymn of the Republic by Julia Ward Howe.

 

150 years ago, black and white abolitionists gathered in Boston to wait and watch with anticipation for the official document that would free the majority of persons enslaved in this nation in the midst of a Civil War. This special program will celebrate this momentous occasion with music and spoken word at the African Meeting House (1806).

   

ADMISSION

Free to first 50 First Night button holders per performance    

& Museum members and children 12 years & under  

General admission: $5; youth 13 - 17 years and seniors 62+: $3   

  

Image: Buy Tickets Here

Please confirm your attendance as seating is limited: 

rsvp@maah.org or (617) 725-0022 x222

FIRST NIGHT BUTTONS

All-access buttons are available in the Museum store and online for $18 each.
Proceeds benefit First Night Boston and the Museum of African American History

Image:  MAAH Logo, Handel and Haydn Society Logo

Visit handelandhaydn.org for more details on the concert.

Image: MLK and Signs of Freedom

 

Image: African Meeting House Exterior - At Night

 

 

 

 

Celebrate the opening of our new exhibit
on the 206th birthday of the African Meeting House.

Thursday, December 6, 2012

MAAH Boston Campus
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

12noon to 6pm
Open house

5pm
Exhibit Talk with Executive Director
Beverly Morgan-Welch

Holiday Refreshments

 

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
and Signs of Freedom

Exhibit open now through February 2013

This exhibit celebrates the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other heroes of the Civil Rights Movement. Rare photographs by Ernest Withers of Martin Luther King Jr., poignant scenes of the American Civil Rights movement, and powerful broadsides from the abolitionist movement commemorate campaigns for human liberty. <more>

CREDITS: Photo: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy (Montgomery, Alabama, 1956) ride on one of the first desegregated buses after the Montgomery Bus Boycott. ©Ernest C. Withers Family Trust, courtesy of Decaneas Archive, Boston, Massachusetts

 

 

Image: David Walker's: "Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World"

 

Image:  Bookcover, Peter Hink's: "To Awaken My Afflicted Brethren"

 

 

David Walker Memorial Project

 

Join the Museum of African American History,

Community Change, Inc., and featured speakers, including

 

Historian Peter P. Hinks



Thursday, September 27, 2012

6:00 - 8:00pm

 

Museum of African American History

Boston Campus:  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

 

David Walker (1796/97-1830) wrote and distributed his Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, influencing William Lloyd Garrison and many other social activists and abolitionists. Historians now regard Walker’s Appeal as one of the most important social and political documents of the 19th century.  Walker spent his most influential years in Boston.

 

The David Walker Memorial Project is based at our beloved Horace Seldon’s Community Change, Inc., a hub of social activism and education in Boston since 1968.  The project goals include making David Walker’s contributions to ending slavery and life accomplishments better known through a memorial project and a new website.

 

Featured speakers will include historian Peter P. Hinks, author of a biography of Walker, To Awaken My Afflicted Brethren.

 

PLEASE RSVP

Cara Liasson or call

(617) 725-0022 x222

 

Bring ticket into event for validated parking discount

(under Holiday Inn Express on Cambridge Street: $5.00)

 

For more information please go to the
David Walker Memorial website

_________

 

BOSTON MUSEUM & EVENT ADMISSIONS

General and Event admission: $5.00;
youth 13 - 17 years and seniors 62+: $3.00; 

Members and all kids 12 years & under: free.

 

BOSTON MUSEUM HOURS

Monday through Saturday, 10am-4pm

 

 

Image:  More Than Freedom - Bookcover

Image:  Author Stephen Kantrowitz

Author

Stephen Kantrowitz

 

 

Image: Museum of African American History Logo
MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

and

Image:  National Park Service Logo
BOSTON AFRICAN AMERICAN NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
National Park Service

invite you to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the
“preliminary” Emancipation Proclamation with

Stephen Kantrowitz
Author of More than Freedom:
Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic,

1829 - 1889

Thursday, September 20 at 6pm

MAAH Boston Campus
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill


On September 22, 1862, President Lincoln issued the “preliminary” Emancipation Proclamation in the midst of the Civil War, declaring that if the Confederate armies did not end the fighting and rejoin the Union by January 1, 1863, all those enslaved in the rebellious states would be free.

Join us in the African Meeting House as Stephen Kantrowitz discusses his new book, More than Freedom: Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829-1889, which chronicles the epic struggle to abolish slavery in America through the lives of black and white activists in and around Boston.

Stephen Kantrowitz, a native of Brookline, Massachusetts, is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His first book, Ben Tillman and the Reconstruction of White Supremacy, was a New York Times Notable Book that won several scholarly awards.

 

Book signing and reception followed the program.

 

 

Image: L'Merchie Frazier

L'Merchie Frazier

Image: Kathryn Grover

Kathryn Grover

 

Hidden on Beacon Hill:
Boston's 19th Century Black History

 

Wednesday, May 23, 2012
5:30pm Reception * 6:00pm Program
MAAH BOSTON CAMPUS
46 Joy Street * Beacon Hill


In the 19th century, Boston's free African American community
residing on Beacon Hill led the nation in the movement to end slavery and to
achieve equal rights. With the African Meeting House as their gathering place,
these remarkable patriots established businesses, founded organizations,
and created schools. Their houses of worship, homes, schools, and
Underground Railroad sites represent a moving and
fascinating slice of American history.

 

FEATURING

L'Merchie Frazier
Education Director, Museum of African American History

Kathryn Grover
Author, Fugitive Gibraltar: Escaping Slaves and Abolitionism in
New Bedford, Massachusetts; Co-author, Historic Resource Study
of the Boston African American Historic Site

Plus presentations by
Beacon Hill residents and Susanne Besser, Mary and John Gier, Vincent Licenziato, Dana Smith, Michael Terranova, Bernadette Williams, and Victor Zabek.

Co-sponsored by the Beacon Hill Civic Assocation
and The Beacon Hill Scholars.

Experience historic Beacon Hill and learn about the free black community that thrived on the north slope in the 1800s.

Visit www.maah.org for an audio tour of the Black Heritage Trail®,
or to take a free walking tour with National Park Service Rangers, Boston African American National Historic Site.

Will "Cannonball" Jackiman, photo courtesy of the Cannonball Foundation

Photo: Courtesy of the Cannonball Foundation

Will "Cannonball" Jackman

"Best Ballplayer
You Have Never Heard Of."

Article:

"Preserving Fabric History"

By

Joel Brown
Boston Globe Correspondent

Image:  Catch the Color of Baseball in Boston, a new exhibit at the Museum of African American History in Boston, MA - Spring thru Fall 2012

The History of Black Teams, the Players
and a Sporting Community


Image:  West Newton Colored Giants Team Photo 1936, courtesy of Historic Newton

West Newton Colored Giants 1936 Photo: Courtesy of Historic Newton


Saturday, May 19, 2012

12:30 - 4:00 pm

MAAH BOSTON CAMPUS
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill

ENJOY A DAY FULL OF FUN ACTIVITY AND LEARNING


Catch our new exhibit

The Color of Baseball in Boston:
The History of Black Teams, the Players
and a Sporting Community, plus...

 



BASEBALL MEMORIES AND MEMORABILIA
Show your favorite baseball keepsakes and tell memorable stories.

CHILDREN'S BASEBALL SCAVENGER HUNT
Young visitors hunt for clues in the exhibit to win a prize.

DOCUMENTARY FILM:
"ONLY THE BALL WAS WHITE"

Paul Winfield narrates documentary on
forgotten Athletes of Baseball's Negro League.

 

Throughout the 1900's, before Jackie Robinson broke baseball'scolor barrier in 1946,

black baseball talent blossomed in the Negro Leagues. Baseball buffs  still sing the praises of

Josh Gibson, counted on to  hit 70 homeruns in a season, and Satchel Paige,  who pitched

over 100 no-hitters in his career, and other top flight players from the Negro Leagues.

A 30-minute film shown through the day.


GALLERY TALKS

 

12:30PM
 

Will "Cannonball" Jackman:
"The Best Ballplayer You Have Never Heard of"

Mike Ginns, Founder and Director,
The Cannonball Foundation

 

1:30PM

 

Black Baseball in Boston before 1900


Bijan C. Bayne, sports journalist, author of
Sky Kings: Black Pioneers of Professional Basketball, and contributing writer for
"The Color of Baseball in Boston."

 

2:30PM

 

The Boston Tigers:
Dubbed the "Champion Colored Nine of New England"

Dr. Robert L. Cvornyek, Chair of the History Department
at Rhode Island College, author of Baseball in Newark;
editor of Negro Baseball... Before Integration by Effa Manley
and Leon Herbert Hardwick, and principal scholar for
"The Color of Baseball in Boston."


GUIDED TOURS OF THE AFRICAN MEETING HOUSE
11:00am - 3:00pm - Hourly

A Gathering Place for Freedom
Walk in the footsteps of abolitionist giants in the most important
African American National Historic Landmark in the United States, recently reopened after $9.5 million historic restoration. National Park Service Rangers, Boston African American National Historic Site, lead hourly tours year round.

Image:  Catch the Color of Baseball in Boston, a new exhibit at the Museum of African American History in Boston, MA - Spring thru Fall 2012

A new exhibition that sheds light on early American sports history

and commemorates the 100th anniversary of Fenway Park.

Don't miss this unique collection of photographs and equipment of the day, including the uniform of

Will "Cannonball" Jackman, referred to as the"Best Ballplayer You Have Never Heard Of"

and learn about the West Newton Colored Tigers (1936).

Admissions / Directions
Museum entrance fees apply.

Accessible for all.

Image:  2012 Living Legends Awards, Thursday, May 3, 2012, Four Seasons Hotel


2012 Living Legends Event Page

The Museum of African American History

is proud to salute extraordinary trailblazers whose remarkable accomplishments uphold the legacy of those 18th and 19th century black patriots whose stalwart commitment to freedom

and justice helped build our American democracy.


THE 2012 LIVING LEGENDS

Diane B. Patrick

Attorney & First Lady of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts


Dr. S. Allen Counter

Director of the Harvard Foundation,
Renowned Neurologist and Explorer 

 

Jim Rice 

Red Sox Hall of Famer
and Former Major League Baseball Player 

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 2012 

 
Four Seasons Hotel * Boston 
 
5:30pm 
Leadership Sponsor Reception
6:00pm Reception and Living Legends Awards

Dinner and dessert celebration * Live music
Business or festive attire


HONORARY CO-CHAIRS 


The Honorable John F. Kerry
and Teresa Heinz Kerry


The Honorable Scott Brown
and Gail Huff 


The Honorable Deval L. Patrick 

The Honorable Thomas M. Menino
and Angela Menino



CO-CHAIRS  


Jackie and Windsor Glenn, EMC

Norman and Tina Lang, JP Morgan

PLEASE HELP US COMMEMORATE
A LEGACY OF CHAMPIONS

 Click here to attend or support
 
Call 617.725.0022, ext. 222

Image: Photographer Don West

Don West

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

invites you to


Celebrate American History in Boston
and Nantucket

 

MAAH BOSTON

“Portraits of Purpose” Family Workshop

Meet noted photographer Don West and find out how he created these life-sized portraits of community leaders from Boston and beyond. Be sure to catch the critically acclaimed Portraits of Purpose exhibit before it closes.

Join L'Merchie Frazier, MAAH's Director of Education
and renowned visual and performance artist, for an interactive workshop. Find out what kind of leader you are/will be, and create your own portrait.

Saturday ● March 31 ● 2012

3:30PM

In the newly restored African Meeting House


MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY 

46 JOY STREET ● BEACON HILL

Admission fees apply, unless otherwise noted.

Contact MAAH Boston

Email • rsvp@maah.org
Phone • 617.725.0022, x222

 

Image: Millenium Conversation, Save the Date, Tuesday, March 27, 2012

 

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

invites you to


'Generation Next for a "Glocal" World'
A Candid Conversation with a
New Generation of Boston Leaders


TUESDAY ● MARCH 27 ● 2012

6:00pm

at the

Historic African Meeting House
MAAH Boston * 46 Joy Street

Leaders with diverse professional expertise and models for success help shape the conversation about the next generation of leaders. Join us in the historic African Meeting House as we investigate how local empowerment impacts Boston's global footprint.

Participants include:

 

Image: Akiba Abaka

AKIBA ABAKA


Producing artistic director of the Up

You Mighty Race theater company

tells stories about the black experience in an unconventional way. Led the roving theater troupe for seven years, before settlling in as the first black company to reside at the Boston Center for the Arts.

   
Image: George "Chip" Greenidge, Photo Credit - Don West

GEORGE "CHIP" GREENIDGE


Convened young black professionals

to explore ways to make Boston more welcoming to people of color. As chair of Boston Connects, provides grants and loans to non-profits and businesses in economically distressed neighborhoods, enabling people to become financially self-sufficient.

   
Image: JOSÉ MASSÓ, Photo Credit - Don West

JOSÉ MASSÓ, moderator


Diverse career includes political liaison

on the presidential campaign trail, investigative TV journalist, innovative high school teacher, high-powered sports agent and, over the last 36 years, bilingual announcer and producer of "¡Con Salsa!" airing on WBUR 90.9 FM.

   
Image: TULAINE MONTGOMERY, Photo Credit - Don West

TULAINE MONTGOMERY


Helped low-income youth enter college, then the 21st century workforce; co-founded Citizen Schools, a nationally recognized after-school program; and facilitated the State of Black Boston Report, analyzing social and economic issues affecting Boston's black population.


Entrance fees apply / Directions Please confirm your participation: email or phone (617) 725-0022 x222

Photo Credits -

GREENIDGE, MASSÓ & MONTGOMERY
Courtesy of Don West, "Portraits of Purpose"

ABAKA

Courtesy of Akiba Abaka & Up You Mighty Race theater company

 

Contact MAAH Boston

Email • rsvp@maah.org
Phone • 617.725.0022, x222

 

Image: Mark Auslander, Author of The Accidental Slaveowner.

Mark Auslander

'The Accidental Slaveowner'


Image: Quilt from Accidental Slaveowner


Revisiting a Myth of Race and Finding an American Family

by Mark Auslander

Historic African Meeting House

Thursday * March 22, 2012 * Program 6pm
Booksigning and Reception with Author Follows Program

MAAH Boston * 46 Joy Street * Beacon Hill

Mark Auslander's "The Accidental Slaveowner" explores how the story of one specific enslaved woman, known as Miss Kitty, has been told and retold across lines of race and difference in a single Georgia town over 160 years. The author explores interracial struggles for dialogue and community reconciliation in the wake
of this difficult, painful history.


Auslander is Associate Professor of Anthropology & Museum Studies and director of the Museum of Culture and Environment in
Central Washington University in Ellensburg, WA.  He is a sociocultural anthropologist with strong interests in political and symbolic processes in Africa and the African Diaspora.

Admissions / Directions: Museum entrance fees apply

RSVP: Please confirm your participation by email

or phone (617) 725-0022 x222.

 

Image:  Bookcover, To Free a Family, the Journey of Mary Walker

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

invites you to


Celebrate American History in Boston
and Nantucket

 

MAAH BOSTON

Professor Sydney Nathans

Professor Nathans, author, historian, and one-time fellow
of the DuBois Institute at Harvard University, will share
insights about his new book. Beverly Morgan-Welch, executive director of the Museum of African American
History, will introduce the guest speaker and offer some context for the book about Mary Walker and her
experience in Cambridge in the 1850s.

Co-sponsored by:

the Cambridge Center for Adult Education, Museum of
African American History, and the DuBois Institute.

 

Thursday ● February 23 ● 2012

1:00PM

In the newly restored African Meeting House


CAMBRIDGE CENTER for ADULT EDUCATION

42 BRATTLE STREET ● CAMBRIDGE

 

Contact MAAH Boston

Email • rsvp@maah.org
Phone • 617.725.0022, x222

Image: Honorable Reverand Michael E. Haynes

Honorable Rev. Michael E. Haynes

Photo Portrait by: Don West

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

invites you to



Celebrate American History in Boston
and Nantucket

 

MAAH BOSTON

“A Profile In Color”

A Candid Conversation with the
Honorable Reverend Michael E. Haynes

Wednesday ● February 8 ● 2012

Newtorking Reception: 6:00PM

Program: 7:00PM

In the newly restored African Meeting House


MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY 

46 JOY STREET ● BEACON HILL

 

Reverend Haynes will provide insight into his life growing up in Boston, 40-year ministry at the historic Twelfth Baptist Church, friendship with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and public service as a state representative. Born of immigrant parents and a former sportswriter, Rev. Haynes joined Twelfth Baptist Church’s ministerial staff in 1951, along with Dr. King, while both were Divinity students in Boston. The esteemed pastor is featured in Don West’s Portraits of Purpose: A Tribute to Leadership Boston, 1980 – 2012, on display at the Museum through March 2012. Admission fees apply.

 

Admission fees apply, unless otherwise noted.

Contact MAAH Boston

Email • rsvp@maah.org
Phone • 617.725.0022, x222

See what's happening at MAAH on Nantucket

Image:  Book cover, "Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?" What it means to be Black now, by Touré, Forward by Michael Eric Dyson

Image: Author Touré

Author Touré

 

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

invites you to a

Book Party

WHO'S AFRAID OF POST-BLACKNESS?

What it Means to be Black Now  

 

Touré

 

Foreword by Michael Eric Dyson

 

THURSDAY ● JANUARY 26 ● 6:00PM

View video of entire event here.


MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY 

46 JOY STREET ● BEACON HILL

 

Meet the author in the newly restored  

African Meeting House

 RECEPTION FOLLOWS IN ABIEL SMITH SCHOOL
 

Over the past two decades, Touré has become a force in journalism, TV, pop culture criticism, and the literary world.  And now, he's tackling his toughest subject yet.  His new book is a fascinating, entertaining, thought-provoking, sobering, angering, and at times laugh-out-loud examination of what it means to be Black in America today.  He draws on interviews with over 100 prominent African-Americans from art to politics to journalism to academia - with words from Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to Soledad O'Brien - as well as his own thoughts and experiences.

"...(Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?) is one of the most
acutely observed accounts of what it is like to be young,
black and middle-class in contemporary America.
Touré inventively draws on a range of evidence - auto¬
biography, music, art, interviews, comedy and popular
social analysis - for a performance carried through with
unsparing honesty..."


- New York Times Book Review, September 2011


BOOKS AVAILABLE AT MUSEUM STORE

Space is limited
Entrance fees apply
RSVP to rsvp@maah.org or call (617) 725-0022 x222

 

UPCOMING BOSTON EVENTS

February Black History Month

April Color of Baseball in Boston Exhibit Opening

 

UPCOMING NANTUCKET EVENTS

January 27, 7pm Theatre Workshop and Nantucket Comedy Festival (Nantucket Atheneum)
February 12 - 19
Nantucket's 6th Annual One Book, One Island

featuring Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon
(Nantucket African Meeting House and other venues)

 

 

Dr. Alvin Poussaint

Steve Grossman

 

Dr. Lee Pelton

Tulaine Marshall

Boston Celebrates King

MONDAY ● JANUARY 16 ● 1:00PM
FANEUIL HALL - BOSTON

The Museum of African American History joins
Mayor Thomas M. Menino and
the Mayor’s Office of Arts, Tourism & Special Events
and Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras (BYSO)

to present


A free tribute concert in honor of
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.


Featuring

Dr. Alvin Poussaint
Harvard Medical School's dedicated professor and
internationally renowned author delivers the keynote address

Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras’
Intensive Community Program

Marta Zurad conducts moving selection of classical music, spirituals and freedom songs.

Image: Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra in concert


Spoken tributes by distinguished roster of leaders
featuring some of Dr. King's most memorable writings and speeches:

Steve Grossman • Treasurer of Massachusetts
Dr. Lee Pelton • President of Emerson College
Tulaine Marshall • a founding staff member of Citizen Schools.

<More on the event & videos from past MLK events>

 

William Lloyd Garrison

Horace Seldon

Civil Rights Activist &
Retired Ranger

180th Anniversary of the
New England Anti-Slavery Society
January 1832 - January 2012

(This featured event is on-going)

 

Celebrate the founding of the New England Anti-Slavery Society with a tour of the National Historic Landmark where it all began.

180 years ago January, 1832, William Lloyd Garrison formed this seminal abolitionist group in the Infant School Room at the Museum of African American History's African Meeting House, now beautifully restored and open to the public once again on Boston's Beacon Hill. <more>

On January 6th, 1832, Garrison stated, "We have met tonight in this obscure Schoolhouse; our numbers are few and our influence limited; but mark my prediction, Faneuil Hall shall ere long echo with the principles we have set forth. We shall shake the nation by their mighty power."

Take a guided tour of the first anti-slavery church in the United States with a National Park Service Ranger telling stories of Garrison, Fredrick Douglass, Mariah Stewart, and all the men, women, and children who faced great opposition and stood as a united force for freedom. Walk in the footsteps of these abolitionist giants and see how the pristine restoration has returned the African Meeting House, considered the Black Faneuil Hall, to its 1855 appearance and to an ideal venue for civil discussion about social and economic issues of the day, intimate theater, concerts, weddings, and other special events .

Help us pay tribute to leaders — then and now — who dedicated themselves to shaking the nation and creating a better world. Browse Don West's critically acclaimed "Portraits of Purpose" exhibit, featuring current innovators and pioneers who follow Garrison's leadership example.

MAAH HOURS:
Open daily, except Sundays, 10am - 4pm
Tours hourly, from 11am to 3pm
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston

MAAH ENTRANCE FEES APPLY:
General admission: $5
Members & children 12 years and under: Free
Youth 13-17 & seniors 62 and over: $3

Image: Visit the African Meeting House, Boston, MA - Pulpit, pews and staircase

Museum of African American History • 46 Joy Street • Beacon Hill • Boston
Boston historic sites are accessible for all.

Join the Museum
Become a new member, renew your membership, or make a donation.

Visit the African Meeting House Celebration page for information about celebration events and tours.

Click here to learn more about the African Meeting House Restoration.

2011 Events

Daniel Rasmussen

THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

 

Presents

AMERICAN UPRISING:
The Untold Story of America’s
Largest Slave Revolt

New York Times Best Seller

Wednesday, November 9, 2011,
6:00 pm
Reception at 5:30 pm
46 Joy Street, Boston

With Author
Daniel Rasmussen

A native of Washington, DC and graduate of Harvard College, Rasmussen has always been passionate about investigative journalism. His book is based upon his college thesis that won Harvard’s top undergraduate academic honor.

Admission: $5 adults; $3 students and seniors
rsvp@maah.org


Books available at Museum Store

Co-sponsored by
Boston African American National Historic Site and the
Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice

Discounted parking at
Cambridge Street Garage under Holiday Inn

 

Image: Black Gotham book cover.

Dr. Carla L. Peterson

October 12, 2011

BLACK GOTHAM with Dr. Carla L. Peterson

Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston
5:30pm Reception
6:00pm Program

Dr. Carla L. Peterson, professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park will read from and sign her book, Black Gotham. Part detective tale, part social and cultural narrative, Black Gotham is Peterson's riveting account of her quest to reconstruct the lives of her nineteenth-century ancestors. As she shares their stories and those of their friends, neighbors, and business associates, she illuminates the greater history of African-American elites in New York City. Black Gotham won Honorable Mention in the 2011 New York Book Festival Biography/Autobiography Category. Yale University Press.

Admission: $5 adults; $3 students and seniors

rsvp@maah.org

Books available at Museum Store

 

 

Co-sponsored by Boston African American National Historic Site and

 Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice

Smithsonian - Museum Day, Free Admission to the Museum of African American History, Click on image for tickets

September 24, 2011

SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE MUSEUM DAY

10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston

The Museum of African American History is participating in the Annual Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day on Saturday, September 24, 2011 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. FREE ADMISSION for one person plus a guest. Go to http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/ to download your ticket for free admission to the Museum on September 24, 2011 and receive a 10% discount in our Museum Store.

Image: PIP Open House, September 17, Museum of African American History, Boston, MA  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston

September 17, 2011

PARTNERS IN PRESERVATION
OPEN HOUSE DAY

10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston

The Museum of African American History is happy to be participating in the First Annual Partners in Preservation Open House Day along with 13 other of Greater Boston’s incredible historic sites. Visit the Abiel Smith School at 46 Joy Street, Boston to experience our exhibition, Treasures from the Collections, view our video, Building on a Firm Foundation, and walk the Black Heritage Trail®.

A special guided Open House Black Heritage Trail® tour will leave from the Smith School at 12 noon. Another tour at 2:00 pm will begin at the Shaw Memorial across from the State House on Beacon Street.

Register for either tour at 617-742-5415.

FREE TOTE BAGS FOR THE FIRST 100 VISITORS

Thanks to all of you who voted for us during the competition in 2009, the Museum of African American History was a proud recipient of a $100,000 grant from Partners in Preservation. Partners in Preservation is program of American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation formed to increase the public’s awareness of the importance of historic preservation in the United States and to preserve America’s historic and cultural places.

Plan to visit some of the other Partners in Preservation sites hosting Open Houses on September 17.

BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE SITES
• José Mateo Ballet Theatre, Cambridge
• Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge
• Old North Church, Boston
• Paul Revere House, Boston
• Vilna Shul, Boston’s Center for Jewish Culture, Boston

SUBURBAN SITES
• Edgell Memorial Library, Framingham
• Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House, Concord
• Lowell’s Boat Shop, Amesbury
• Old Ship Meeting House, Hingham
• Paragon Carousel, Hull
• Salem Old Town Hall, Salem
• Schooner Adventure, Gloucester
• United First Parish Church, “Church of the Presidents,” Quincy

Thursday, September 15, 2011

 

Celebrating Challenges and Champions:
From Houston to Marshall to the 21st Century


Registration and lunch: Noon
Program: 1:30 - 5:30 pm
Book signing and reception: 5:30 - 6:30 pm

Ropes Gray Room (2nd Floor)
Pound Hall, Harvard Law School
1563 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." These words of Martin Luther King, Jr., himself borrowing from 19th century abolitionist Theodore Parker, continue to resonate with experience. During our Celebration of Champions and Challenges, we will explore this arc as it passed from Charles Hamilton Houston to Thurgood Marshall in the 20th century and continues to bend toward justice today. We will hear personally from those with direct knowledge and experience of the champions and their challenges and others who can guide us going forward.

Registration is Free - Click here

Image: Bookcover, Governor Deval Patrick, "A Reason to Believe"
MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

 

PRESENTS

An Interview and Book Signing with
Governor Deval Patrick

View Video

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011 at 6:00pm
(doors open at 5:00 pm for book sales)

C. Walsh Theatre, Suffolk University
55 Temple Street, Boston, MA 02114

Saturday, July 23, 2011 at 3:00pm
(doors open at 2:00 pm for book sales)

Trinity Worship Center
United Methodist Church of Martha's Vineyard
40 Trinity Park
Oak Bluffs, MA 02557

PRE-PURCHASE THE BOOK online FOR MEMBERSHIP DISCOUNT AND PRIORITY SEATING.

Reserve your book online Today!

Books will be available for pick up one hour prior to program.
Receipt must be presented to receive book.
Books will not be mailed.

Books also available for purchase at
The MAAH Museum Store
46 Joy Street, Boston
10 am – 4 pm Monday-Saturday

Please RSVP at rsvp@maah.org
or call (617) 725-0022, ext. 222


On July 20th, parking will be available for $5 at the
Charles River Plaza parking garage under the
Holiday Inn on Cambridge Street


Image: Boston African American National Historic Site, Indenpendence Week Tours

The Boston African American National Historic Site Independence Week Tours

Saturday, July 2 , 2011 thru
Saturday, July 9, 2011

Full Schedule

Image: Black Walden book cover

Black Walden Bookcover

Image: Elise Lemire

Dr. Elise Lemire

The
Museum of African American History

presents

A reading and book signing event for Dr. Elise Lemire, the Doris and Carl Kempner Distinguished Professor of Literature at Purchase College, SUNY, and her book Black Walden: Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts (2009).

Thursday, June 30th, 2011
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston
5:30pm Reception
6:00pm Program


Books will be available for purchase at the Museum Store

"Today Walden Woods is preserved as a place for visitors to commune with nature. Lemire, who grew up two miles from Walden Pond, reminds us that this was a black space before it was an internationally known green space. Black Walden preserves the legacy of the people who strove against all odds to overcome slavery and segregation."
University of Pennsylvania Press



Please RSVP to
(617) 725-0022 x222 or RSVP@maah.org.

Parking will be available for $5 at the Charles River Plaza parking garage
under the Holiday Inn on Cambridge Street.

 

12 noon, June 30, 2011

 

Click on image to right for more information

Rangers
Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey

The
Museum of African American History

and the

Boston African American
National Historic Site

present

Songs of Freedom:
Music of the Abolitionist Movement


Join us in welcoming New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park Rangers Bruce Barnes and Matt Hampsey as they entertain and educate us with popular songs of the abolitionist movement!

Thursday, June 16, 2011 at 6:00 PM
(Reception starts at 5:30 PM)
Museum of African American History's
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill


Parking will be available for $5 at
the Charles River Plaza parking garage
under the Holiday Inn on Cambridge Street.

 

Please note that there will be an
admission charge at the door for non-members:
ADMISSIONS: Museum Admission $5.00 |
Seniors (62+) $3.00 | Museum Members FREE

For more information,
please visit www.nps.gov/boaf
Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/BAANHS or
Twitter at http://twitter.com/BOAFNPS

You can also call us at (617)742-5415.

 

Dr. John D. Warner

The Annual Meeting
of the
Museum of African American History


Wednesday, April 27, 2011
5:30pm Reception & 6:00pm Meeting
46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill


Guest Speaker: Dr. John D. Warner

 

Crossed Sabres: A History of the Fifth Massachusetts Volunteer Cavalry, an African American Regiment in the Civil War

The Fifth Volunteer Cavalry was the only African American cavalry regiment raised in the northern states during the Civil War. This black cavalry was officered by some of the most prominent sons of the first families of Massachusetts. After nearly a hundred and fifty years of silence, Dr. Warner brings to light the story of their recruitment, training and combat, as well as the alliance between the black enlisted men and white officers.

This program is presented in partnership with
Boston African American National Historic Site,
National Park Service

Admission is free!

Parking will be available for $5 at the Charles River Plaza parking garage, under the Holiday Inn on Cambridge Street. Please bring ticket for validation.

Please RSVP for this event at RSVP@maah.org
or (617) 725-0022, x222

Harriet Tubman

Lois Horton

Historian & Author

Thursday, March 31 at 6 p.m.

Boston African American National Historic Site

and the Museum of African American History

present

 

Harriet Tubman

Museum of African American History’s
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street
Boston, MA

Join us as historian and author Lois Horton talks about her upcoming book on the legendary Underground Railroad leader, Harriet Tubman.

This is the third program in our Civil War Lecture series scheduled for Winter/Spring 2011.


Entrance fees apply.
Museum Members - Free
Adults - $5
13-17 years old and 62 years and over - $3

For more information, please visit www.nps.gov/boaf Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/BAANHS or
Twitter at http://twitter.com/BOAFNPS

You can also call us at (617)742-5415.

Free and Open to the Public

Friends of Dudley Branch Library

65 Warren Street, Roxbury, MA 02119

 

 

Black Dolls on Parade

 

By

 

THE BLACK GOLD DOLL CLUB OF

NEW ENGLAND

 

Saturday, April 16, 2011

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Meet members of the Black Gold Doll Club and their dolls
Bring your dolls for a show and tell beginning at 2:00 p.m.

Light refreshments will be served

Edmund Barry Gaither

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Reception at 5:30 pm

Program at 6:00 pm

The Museum of African American History

Presents  

Allan Crite, A Boston Treasure

with

Edmund Barry Gaither

If you missed the program or want to experience it again, view the video - click here.

Museum of African American History
  46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill, Boston

Edmund Barry Gaither is the founding Director and Curator of the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA), an organization that he developed from a concept to an institution with collections exceeding three thousand objects and a thirty-two year history of exhibitions celebrating the visual arts heritage of black people worldwide. Gaither is also Special Consultant at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston where he has served as curator for eight exhibitions including a ground breaking show in l970, Afro-American Artists: New York and Boston.

Admission: Museum Members - Free, Adults - $5. 13-17 years old, and 62 years and over - $3.

RSVP: 617.725.0022 ext. 222 or rsvp@maah.org

Frederick Douglass

Thursday, February 17th at 6 p.m.

Boston African American National Historic Site

and the Museum of African American History

present

 

The Remarkable Life of

Frederick Douglass

Museum of African American History’s
Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street
Boston, MA

Join us as local author Stephen Kendrick discusses the remarkable life of Frederick Douglass, one of the most important abolitionist and civil rights activists in our nation’s history. Reverend Kendrick will also speak about the origins of Black History Month as part of his presentation. He is the co-author of Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader & a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery & Save the Union and Sarah's Long Walk: How the Free Blacks of Boston and their Struggle for Equality Changed America.

This is the third program in our Civil War Lecture series scheduled for Winter/Spring 2011.


Entrance fees apply.
Museum Members - Free
Adults - $5
13-17 years old and 62 years and over - $3

For more information, please visit www.nps.gov/boaf Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/BAANHS or
Twitter at http://twitter.com/BOAFNPS

You can also call us at (617)742-5415.

Martin Luther King, Jr. with Coretta Scott King, Yolanda Denise King

1956
Photographer: Dan Weiner (1919-1959)

Watch the 2010
MLK Celebration on-line

Visit the 2011
MLK Celebration Page

A Day of Celebration Honoring
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Monday, January 17, 2011
1:00 pm
Faneuil Hall, Boston

Presented by

The Museum of African American History,
The Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra,
and
The City of Boston Mayor's Office of Arts,
Tourism, and Special Events

 

Featuring

A Tribute Concert by the
Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra's

Intensive Community Program

Honored Guest Speaker

Nikki Giovanni

And Readings From the Speeches

and Writings of Dr. King by:

Phillip Clay

Chancellor at MIT

Judge Roderick Ireland

Chief Justice 
of the Massachusetts Supreme Court

Rena Clark

Partner, GenNx360

Charles Sumner (1811 - 1874)

The Museum of African American History

and the

Boston African American National Historic Site

present

The Meaning and Legacy of Charles Sumner

January 20, 2011 at 6 p.m.

Museum of African American History's

Abiel Smith School
46 Joy Street
Beacon Hill, Boston, MA

From his humble roots on Beacon Hill, to his pioneering civil rights work as United States Senator, Charles Sumner helped define the era of the American Civil War. Almost killed on the floor of the Senate for his uncompromising views, Sumner helped to bring about the downfall of slavery and forge a new birth of American freedom. Join us as we celebrate the 200 th anniversary of Sumner's birth with a program by Harvard Professor John Stauffer who will be discussing his upcoming biography of this influential statesman from Massachusetts.

Admission: Museum Members - Free, Adults - $5. 13-17 years old, and 62 years and over - $3.

RSVP: 617.725.0022 ext. 222 or rsvp@maah.org

 

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